A Day of Reckoning

A day of reckoning Columbus Day

Columbus Day is a federal holiday in the United States. This annual holiday is celebrated on the second Monday in October, and it marks the day in 1492 when Christopher Columbus arrived in the New World. But the celebration has always been controversial. In the early 19th century, anti-immigrant groups refused to celebrate the day due to its Catholic associations. Some of these groups claimed that Italians were not white. Today, many Italian Americans view the holiday as a way to honor their heritage. However, the fact remains that Columbus’s arrival in the New World did not create any positive outcomes for the native population.

During the 19th century, European colonizers were able to decimate the indigenous populations of the Americas. They brought disease, smallpox, and enslaved people to the new world. Their actions left behind scars. While the explorers may have sailed the oceans, they did not explore the lands and cultures of the American Indians.

The real story of how Columbus found America is less about heroism and more about human rights abuse. Native Americans were raped, killed, and enslaved, resulting in the loss of thousands of lives. Many Indigenous people continue to feel that the Italian explorer was no hero.

A recent movement to remove monuments to historical figures involved in slavery and colonialism has spawned a global reckoning. For example, several cities in the UK have already removed their Columbus monuments, while monuments to historical figures in the United States and Canada are in the process of being torn down.

As of October 2017, a number of cities and states have already embraced the idea of celebrating Indigenous Peoples’ Day instead of the more conventional Columbus Day. This year, the Baltimore City Council passed a bill to change the name of the day, a move that some say is the first step in taking a look at the role of the Italian explorer in the US. Several other municipalities are also preparing to take the plunge.

One city that has been a leader in this effort is Boston. Mayor Michael Brown has spoken out against the blatantly obvious omission of Indigenous Peoples’ Day from the calendar, and has called for the removal of Columbus-related statues and monuments in the city’s North End neighborhood. Meanwhile, in Chicago, a group known as Indigenous Strong has been pushing for the abolition of the holiday.

Other cities have shown the same interest. For instance, the Philadelphia City Council approved a bill that would rename Columbus Day to “Indigenous Peoples’ Day.” Atlanta is considering the same. Minneapolis recently toppled its own Columbus monument after a large crowd of protesters showed up to the city’s Arrigo Park. Even Atlantic City, the site of a large statue of the explorer, is preparing to remove it.

Despite the various attempts at reform, the era of Columbus Day will probably never end. However, in the meantime, it is worth considering how Columbus’s voyage impacted the lives of Indigenous people.

Columbus Day Ideas For the Whole Family

Columbus day ideas

Columbus Day is a national holiday celebrated on the second Monday in October. It is an opportunity to celebrate with family and friends, but it can also be a good time to teach children about the historical and cultural significance of this holiday. In addition to learning about the explorer’s voyage, you can incorporate some fun and informative activities.

Some of the most popular Columbus Day ideas include a visit to New York, where the Empire State Building and the Top of the Rock observation deck are located. You may even want to take a stroll along the city’s Botanical Garden. The garden has family-friendly paths and seasonal displays, such as Scarecrows & Pumpkins.

For some fun, try decorating your home in honor of Columbus Day. Try adding some nautical decor accents, such as natural seashells or candles.

Another fun idea is to decorate your table with old toy ships. These ships can be adorned with patriotic sweets and decorations, making it a festive place to dine. A centerpiece can be created by filling a glass jar with a fishnet and a few tall white floral stems.

Other Columbus Day ideas are related to his achievements, such as finding a trade route to Asia. In this way, you can learn about the various cultures that inhabited the Americas.

There are several resources available for teachers and parents. One is a book from Eye on Education, which provides a variety of teaching tools and activities for the occasion.

A book titled Rethinking Columbus gets kids thinking about the various perspectives of the famous explorer. This is especially helpful for older students. If you are looking for some more basic lessons on Columbus, consider the Columbus’ Book of Privileges from Eye on Education, which includes a detailed map of the United States and a history of the country.

You can also have your students create a puzzle board using materials from the crew of the three-masted schooner. They can then ask other students to help put it together.

You can also make a world map. You can mount this on your wall, or use bulb string lights to track the route of the trip. Alternatively, you can have your students play a dart game.

Depending on the age of your students, you can choose from a variety of Columbus Day crafts. If you are entertaining a group of toddlers, you can have them create a handprint Columbus ship. Old news papers, paper plates, and cheerios can be used to make some cool and unique crafts.

If you are in the mood for a little outdoor fun, you can participate in the Columbus Day parade, which starts at the 44th Street and Fifth Avenue intersection and marches up Fifth Avenue until it reaches the 72nd Street area. Guests can enjoy donuts or coffee while they wait for the festivities to begin.

You can also add a dash of festive zeal to your Columbus Day celebration by displaying a few miniature American flags. Your guests will love it, and you’ll get some great photos to share.

Why Some Italian-Americans Still Fiercely Defend Columbus Day

Why Some ItalianAmericans Still Fiercely Defend Columbus day

Many Italian-Americans feel strongly about Columbus Day. It celebrates a hero of their heritage and a hero of Western Civilization. But the history of Christopher Columbus is a complex one. In fact, many of the explorer’s darker aspects have gotten more attention than the positive ones. For example, some scholars have highlighted the depopulation of Hispaniola’s indigenous Tainos.

There is also the issue of how Columbus’ voyage relates to the current state of America. While some Italian-Americans celebrate their heritage and the Italian contribution to the country’s founding, others have become very critical of the holiday. Several statues of the explorer have been removed or evicted from public places.

Some Italian-Americans see this as an affront to their ethnic heritage. Others argue that Columbus Day is a celebration of Western Civilization. A recent New York Times article outlines the controversy.

One reason some Italian-Americans continue to fight for the holiday is because Columbus’ achievements and story were an inspiration to them. The explorer was born into a working class family in Genoa, Italy, and grew up to work as a mariner and merchant. As a result, his voyage inspired many others to follow his lead. However, it also made Columbus a target for mockery. After his first trip, Columbus suffered a severe gout attack that left him bedridden for months.

His gout continued to deteriorate in later years. Columbus’ expeditions were a major part of the discovery of the Americas. He established several colonies, including in Haiti and Cuba. Most of the natives who accompanied him on his travels died on his return trip. This, coupled with the fact that the natives’ population was steadily declining, made Columbus’ voyages a controversial subject for many.

Another reason some Italian-Americans have continued to fight for the holiday is because of the connection between Columbus and the enslavement of Native Americans. Columbus and his crew introduced the United States to the Atlantic slave trade, which was already underway. Additionally, the natives were abused by Columbus and his crew.

Although Columbus’ contributions to the American economy have sparked controversy, his journeys also set the stage for the eventual emergence of the United States. As a result, the explorer became an icon for Italian-American Catholics. These Italians, as well as other immigrants, saw Columbus as a symbol of their immigrant roots. At the same time, their newfound identity as Italian Americans gave them an identity apart from the xenophobic and discriminatory American culture they were facing.

Regardless of what their opinions are, many Italian-Americans have come to appreciate the explorer’s contributions to their country. Their celebration of Columbus Day has spanned centuries. During the 19th century, several Italian-American organizations began to lobby for federal recognition of the day.

Eventually, Congress passed a law making the day a national holiday. The holiday officially became a federal holiday in 1937. Unfortunately, the number of elected officials who have publicly supported keeping the holiday has dwindled. Yet some Italian-Americans, such as Mayor Michael Bloomberg of New York, have stood in strong support.